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Issue 2015/3

© EXARC, 2015; ISSN: 2212-8956; Publishing date: August 30, 2015

The EXARC Journal consists of  Mixed Matters articles, which are open access. We also made open access articles related to the OpenArch project. The other articles are peer-reviewed and for members only (please login at the bottom of the page). They will become open access 2 years after the publishing date.

If you would like to see our most recent articles, please Become EXARC Member.

The list below shows the members Only Contents of Issue 2015-3

Archaeological Open-Air Museum

Construction of a Neolithic Longhouse Model in the Museum of Prehistory Urgeschichtemuseum (MAMUZ)
Matthias W. Pacher, MAMUZ and Wolfgang F.A. Lobisser, VIAS (AT)

The Creation of an Experimental Camp of Protohistory at the Iberian Settlement of Estinclells (Verdú, Urgell, Catalonia)
J. Morer De Llorens, R. Cardona Colell (CAT) et al.

Experimental Archaeology

A Gaulish Throwing Stick Discovery in Normandy: Study and Throwing Experimentations
L. Bordes, A. Lefort and F. Blondel (FR)

Experimental Archaeology

Experiencing Visible and Invisible Metal Casting Techniques in the Bronze Age Italy

M. Barbieri,
C. Cavazzuti,
L. Pellegrini and
F. Scacchetti (IT)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***What we know about Bronze Age metalworking in Italy basically relies on finished artefacts and on stone, clay or bronze implements involved in the process of manufacturing (tuyères, crucibles, moulds, hammers, chisels, et cetera; Bianchi, 2010; Bianchi, in press).

Ancient Technology

Knapping Skill Assessment

Bruce Bradley (UK) and
Nada Khreisheh (USA)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***This article is derived from a presentation made by the senior author at the OpenArch Conference "Working with stones in European Pre- and Proto-history in theory and in practice" organised by the Archaeological-Ecological Centre Albersdorf (DE), 23-27 September, 2013.

Interpretation

What Does Your Visitor Experience? Making the Most of Live Interpretation in a Unique Setting.

Marc van Hasselt (NL)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***Archaeological Open-Air Museums (AOAM) offer a unique setting in which live interpretation can make history come truly alive. For many, or perhaps all, AOAM history is the product being sold to the public. During the five years the OpenArch project has run the partners have spent many hours discussing the merits of live interpretation in the unique setting of an AOAM.